All Men Are Pigs reviews (in English, Russian, Norwegian)

Record link

Pitchfork: “Fe-Mail are Maja Ratkje and Hild Sofie Tafjord, both formerly of the Norwegian experimental electro-acoustic quartet Spunk. You might also know Ratkje from her exceptional 2002 solo album Voice, on which she demonstrated how the bizarre fury of a woman scorned could produce as intimidating, recklessly creative storm as any force in nature. Only, she didn’t actually seem scorned; her solo work, and that with Fe-Mail, can be abrasive, but in general seems more the work of someone who takes more than a little pride in fucking with people. The duo’s music, represented on 2003′s Syklubb fra Hælvete and the new All Men Are Pigs, can seem an exercise in pushing buttons– and not necessarily just the electronic kind. Apparently, Fe-Mail want to see just how far they can lead me into a semi-chaotic world, daring me to lean in closer so they can pounce with industrial loops and howling electronic screams. Surprising, then, to discover that their brand of noise (Merzbow is a better point of reference than any of their peers at Rune Grammofon) is so fetching. Living up to the questionable pun of their moniker, Fe-Mail delight in using images of female sexuality and glamour to contrast the iron-fisted free terror of their music. They pose as calendar models on their album covers– or use Rik Rawling’s lurid cartoons fusing softcore porn with heavy artillery– and seem only too happy to exploit their rather attractive competitive advantage. I get the feeling they’re trying to tell me something, too, be it an ironic statement about improvised noise music, or just a kiss-off to all the hipster chauvinists of the world. Regardless of the concept, Syklubb and All Men deliver on purely musical fronts in spades, so you don’t need to feel very guilty for having a nagging urge to stare at the CD jackets. (…) All Men Are Pigs was recorded with photographer and noise musician Lasse Marhaug, and serves as a pretty good “fuck you” to anyone expecting shyer music. If Syklubb had been a study in varying shades of noise, this one is outright terror. Grating, overdriven fuzz swirls through pieces that mix bits of sampled metal guitar and radio static into a single, continuous strip of blades. Rarely, as on “Here’s That Rainy Day, Sid Hendrix’ Last Grunt”, the storm subsides into smaller pockets, though most of All Men seems designed to push listeners accustomed to “lighter” structures to their breaking points. Of course, this is what makes All Men such a captivating listen. Rather than milk the fury until it no longer has any impact, Fe-Mail know just when to say “when,” and how to frame chaos in the barest skeleton so as to suggest that what is happening isn’t strictly chaotic, but a spiky, ill-tempered tone poem. The surreal, nightmarish collages at the outset of “Charmed” seem to logically prepare me for the paranoid apocalypse of its conclusion; the future-jungle calls of “Fresh from the Flesh, On a Bed of Roses” sound like perfect foils for its percussive gearshift loop and maniacal guitar. During a time when many noise and electronic musicians are downsizing to laptops and minimal improvisation, it’s refreshing to hear an outfit that has little-to-no appreciation for respectable expectations.” (Dominique Leone)

Dusted Magazine: “Feminism in music has taken many different forms in recent years, from the pop sheen of No Doubt’s “Just a Girl” to the harder edged punk rock of Bikni Kill and their sisters in the Pacific Northwest. Fe-Mail’s feminism is of a more humorous, if not facetious, vein than the aforementioned, but that doesn’t stop the Norwegian duo from unleashing some caustic grrrl power of their own. Neither Hild Sofie Tafjord or Maja S.K. Ratkje seem overtly interested in preaching an agenda or using their music as a political platform, but despite (and, most likely, because of) this lack of overt polemics, Fe-Mail are a stark example of the fact that noise isn’t just for the boys. Joined by (as the album title’s logic dictates) pig and fellow Norwegian Lasse Marhaug, Fe-Mail cause a stir on All Men are Pigs that renders everything but the ferocity of the music an afterthought. Dispensing with the traditional Scandanavian austerity, Tafjord, Ratkje, and Marhaug are architects of tumultuous noise explosions, mangling electronics, samples and the human voice into a mess of sound that would be frightening if it weren’t so meticulously crafted. Unlike the artists whose medium is sheer, uncontrolled audio destruction, Fe-Mail seem to craft each cataclysmic moment with care, and their shuddering improvisations move with a definite sense of development and resolution. Obvious beats and more ghostly, underlying rhythms propel the music from its most chillingly placid moments (which are few) to the frenzied zeniths of the group’s noisy constructions. Seeped in static and distorted sound samples, All Men are Pigs seems to operate at near speaker-shredding volume, even at a stereo’s quietest setting, as the three musicians stretch and bend the music in an epic match of tug o’ war, There’s no sense of internal competition here, though, only mutual determination and resolution, and the album is stronger for it. Individual voices are lost among the fray, and the efforts of the trio far outweigh and overshadow any singular contribution. As the disc starts, “Oh, You Gritty Thing” explodes in a near-animal frenzy, as a mechanical snarl is damaged and demolished over the course of over seven minutes, and while “Charmed” and “Here’s that Rainy Day, Sid Hendrix’ Last Grunt” don’t reach such levels of aural bombast, there’s never a lull in the album’s intensity or drive. There doesn’t seem to be an obvious reason for the recent mini-explosion of noise music exports from Norway. However, Tafjord, Ratkje, and Marhaug, as well as Marhaug’s duo Jazzkammer, Frode Gjerstad, Noxagt, and others are making a noisy name for a country that usually receives notoriety for the black metal of Satyricon, Enslaved, Ulver and their stylistic brethren. All Men are Pigs is another damaged feather in the country’s cap, making a stormy clamor that would even impress that father of Norse thunder himself.” (Adam Strohm)

Machine Radionoise: “FE-MAIL – норвежский нойз-дуэт Maja Ratkje и Hild Sofie Tafjord. Нужно сказать, что девушки играют вместе на протяжении десяти лет, однако происходило это в рамках девичьего анархистского импровизационного квартета с глумливым названием SPUNK. Как дуэт дамы дебютировали в Токио в 2000 году. С тех пор в дискографии проекта значатся, помимо компиляций, два альбома: “Syklubb Fra Haelvete” (издан TV5 на виниле в 2002 и переиздан в 2004 на CD Important recs.) и “All Men Are Pigs” (в содружестве с музыкантом JAZZKAMMER Lasse Marhaug), о котором пойдёт речь в этой рецензии. Название альбома не стоит воспринимать всерьёз. FE-MAIL – отнюдь не форпост феминизма, и цитат из манифеста Валери Соланас вы здесь не отыщите. В данном случае мы имеем дело всё с той же импровизационной музыкой, которая, отказавшись от традиционных инструментов, перешла к использованию лэптопов, аналоговой электроники, полевых записей и работе с сэмплами. Шесть композиций предлагают нашему вниманию различные методики производства цифро-аналогового noise. Fe-mail live В первой композиции “Oh, You Gritty Thing” (вероятно, намёк на вещь D. Bowie “Oh, You Pretty Thing”) идёт мастерская игра с зацикленным фидбэком. “In the Slicer With Lasse Neuf” – пунктирная пьеса, основным элементом которой, насколько я понимаю, стал glitch. Любителям утонченной работы со звуком рекомендую обратить внимание на трек “Charmed” – микроволна в сочетании с деликатным delay и вкраплениями музыкальных коллажей, вязнущие в грохоте цифрового нойза. Быть может, чем-то такой подход напомнит поздние работы AUBE – очень неплохо. С цифрой мы сталкиваемся и в очень динамичной пьесе “Run Jimmy, Run!”. Стартующая как musique concrete, она быстро обрастает приятными на слух текстурами и демонстрирует грамотное обращение с сэмплами. Два последних этюда с громоздкими названиями “Fresh From The Flesh, On Bed Of Roses” и “Here’s That Rainy Day, Sid Hendrix’ Last Grunt” не выходят за уже обозначенные рамки.”

Panorama.no: “Det kan være vanskelig å definere Fe-Mails musikk uten å på ett eller annet tidspunkt måtte ty til ordet ”støy”. Enkelte vil nok lukke ørene i selskap med All Men Are Pigs på høyttalerne, men i dette menasjeriet av frekvenser og skarrende klanger, finnes det faktisk skjønnhet i det ærlig stygge og utfordrende. Manipulasjon og forvrengninger av to operasangere akkompagnert av piano fremstår høyst sannsynligvis som sterk kost for mange. For andre er dette derimot en portal som fører til en ny verden. Fe-Mails debut Syklubb Fra Hælvete har nettopp blitt relansert på CD, nærmest samtidig med at det nye albumet All Men Are Pigs dukker opp. Maja Ratkje og Hild Sofie Tafjord slår ganske hard fra seg på dette albumet. Her gis ingenting gratis. Selv samplingen av Jimi Hendrix på In The Slicer With Lasse Neuf er knapt gjenkjennelig der resultatet helst minner om en fjern radiokanal som taper mot monsunregn og bølgende torden. Men assosiasjonene er likevel fremme i lyset. Lenge nok til at det er mulig å knytte seg opp mot råmaterialet i bandets uttrykk og som de har som fundament. På All Men Are Pigs er de to damene ikke helt alene. Faktisk har de fått et svin til å hjelpe seg. Lasse Marhaug er kjent som en av våre fremste støymakere og har ikke bare utgitt album som en halvdel av duoen Jazzkammer. Han har jobbet med flere av de beste innen sjangeren, deriblant folk som Kevin Drumm, Merzbow, Paal Nilssen-Love og Maja Ratkje når hun er alene. Det de alle har til felles er en grenseløs kjærlighet til fri musikk. Det skal likevel legges til at han ikke er alene om å ha tung bagasje med seg inn i dette samarbeidet. For både Tafjord og Ratkje har i en årrekke vært viktige brikker i den norske undergrunnen, og de har flere interessante kollaborasjoner bak seg. Førsteinntrykket av All Men Are Pigs kan gi klare assosiasjoner til alt fra femtitallets femme fatales, via punkrockens lek med popkulturen og til Andy Warhol. Om det er korrekte inntrykk for alle som føler for å ta turen innom dette støylandet er en helt annen sak. Rik Rawlings omslagstegning er i hvert fall behjelpelig med å skape slike tanker. Ikke bli overrasket dersom Fe-Mails musikk lokker frem misfornøyde grimaser i omgivelsene dersom du har selskap første gang denne musikken spilles høyt. Det er heller ikke vanskelig å forstå reaksjonen. Fe-Mails uttrykk er nemlig alt annet enn det som først defineres som lett tilgjengelig listefór. Frekvenser formelig hakker seg repetetivt inn i høyttalerne og kutter opp øregangene – omtrent som en kniv gjennom varmt smør. Med ett endres alle parametre til rene fjell av lyd som buldrer nedover mot lytteren i grusomt høylytte skred. Dette krever nemlig sin lytter for å si det sånn, og for de som ikke føler seg “fjellvant nok” til å takle denne villmarken, bør det likevel ikke være for sent å snu. All Men Are Pigs er til syvende og sist et rockalbum for det neste årtusen. For dette feier det meste både hardt og slagkraftig til side. Denne fusjonen av alskens sjangre er i full blomst og vokser i gråsonen et sted mellom jazz og elektronika. Det er ingen overraskelse at det samme kan skje i andres uttrykk. Se eksempelvis bare på hva Wolf Eyes og Fantômas gjør med sjokkrocken til Alice Cooper . For med denne typen aktører er med ett er rocken farlig igjen. For dette er fremtiden folkens! Favn om den nå, og helst før det er for sent!” (Mats Johansen)

Groove.no: “Lasse Marhaug, denne gang som The Swine, ser ut til å ha en stygg og ekkel fetisj for griser. De som ikke vil utforske Marhaugs fetisj bør heller ikke vurdere Phôs siste. Om det er grisefetisjen som har åpnet for dette albumet med de på utsiden så pene jentene Hild Sofie Tafjord og Maja Ratkje er usikkert, men sammen har de ihvertfall stelt i stand en aldri så liten militantfeministisk grisefest der ingrediensene er musikalske versjoner av kjøtt, fett, flesk, blod, spy, sperm, maskinpistoler, radbrekking, hud, hår og Jimi Hendrix. Neida, denne skiva er verken kontroversiell eller for seksuelt frustrerte. Det er heller en form for humor og lek med konvensjoner som på noen (ytterst få) kan virke frastøtende, men som jeg har sans for. Jeg fikk nesten svi for det under forrige Lou Reed konsert i Oslo, da jeg hevdet ovenfor en svoren Reed-fan at Metal Machine Music er den feteste skiva hans. Jeg slapp unna med det, og Fe-mail/Marhaug slipper også unna. All Men Are Pigs preker for en allerede frelst menighet, og når antagelig ikke fram til disse humorløse menneskene som hadde trengt en provokasjon. Tafjord, Ratkje og Marhaug fortsetter altså å relatere rock til støy. Utgangspunktet for dette albumet er en Jimi Hendrix-skive, uvisst hvilken, som er manipulert, vridd, modulert og voldtatt til det ugjenkjennelige. Dette kan assosieres til Hendrix’ radbrekking av den amerikanske nasjonalsangen i sin tid, men de samme radikale implikasjonene er ikke så sterkt tilstede her. Rockpuristene og Hendrix-samlerne holder seg nok langt unna i utgangspunktet. Undertegnede er en beundrer av Hendrix, og det er om ikke annet morsomt å kjenne igjen Hendrix-riffene som av og til virvler til overflaten gjennom den rødlilla tåken av hardcore støy. Denne rekontekstualiseringen av Hendrix i et støyperspektiv er i seg selv et interessant prosjekt, som hadde fortjent et litt større fokus av typen “Fe-mail/Lasse Marhaug tolker Jimi Hendrix” eller “Hendrix Youth – Crosstown (Ass)Traffic” eller noe sånt, bare for skape litt større oppmerksomhet rundt prosjektet. Det blir litt ufokusert å blande inn så mange andre halvmente elementer som feminisme og grisefetisjisme når musikken bærer et så interessant budskap i seg selv. Det er også typisk for scenen å tone ned de musikalske virkemidlene og slenge på en del vikarierende motiver i form av eksempelvis coverart. All Men Are Pigs er et morsomt og brutalt album som på sitt beste tangerer de rå gitarpassasjene til Hendrix (sjekk In the Slicer With Lasse Neuf, Run Jimmy, Run!), men det er ikke like fengslende og interessant som Syklubb Fra Hælvete eller The Comfort of Objects. Definitivt verdt en gjennomlytting eller to.” (Carl Kristian Johansen)

This entry was posted in Other album reviews and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.